Kickoff Celebration - In the Media


On September 10, Resilient by Design hosted an awards show-style kickoff celebration to unveil the 10 Design Teams selected to join Bay Area communities in the Bay Area Challenge. The event, held on the beautiful Richmond shoreline, featured local elected officials and served to introduce the local and global Design Teams to the broader Bay Area community.


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Competition looks at redesign for S.F. Bay as sea levels rises

By John King, September 14, 2017

Bay Area residents know how hard it is to get a full sense of the large and constantly shifting shoreline that frames the body of water at the center of this region.

Now imagine you’re an architect or landscape architect from outside the United States, embarking on an eight-month effort to conceive how different parts of the overall waterfront might function generations from now — not just ecologically, but also in terms of the people and cultures along it.

Read more on The San Francisco Chronicle's site here


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Design Teams Attack Growing Threat for Bay Area Flooding: Rising Seas

By Craig Miller, September 10, 2017

Ten teams of experts will hit the ground this week in a yearlong blitz to bolster the Bay Area against rising seas and other potentially catastrophic risks posed by the changing climate. The project, dubbed Resilient by Design, was inspired by a similar planning challenge to rebuild east coast locations ravaged by “Superstorm” Sandy in October of 2012.

“We’ve realized that our current systems aren’t set up to address what we know is happening,” says Amanda Brown-Stevens, a land use advocate who is heading up the project. “So we want the teams to think outside the box.”

Read more on KQED's site here or on Capital Review's site here


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A Radical New Plan to "Future-Proof" San Francisco

By Tim Nelson, September 14, 2017

San Francisco is one of the many cities in the U.S. threatened by climate change. Scientific projections predict that sea level rise is likely to push tides upwards with accelerating force in the coming decades and a 2012 study estimated that the average high tide within San Francisco Bay could be 66 inches higher by 2100. 

Seeking to face the threat of rising sea levels head on, a group of community, industry and government leaders have launched a new competition in the Bay Area that seeks to restore shoreline resiliency, the phrase encompassing techniques that resist rising tides while at the same time providing ecological benefits. Think approaches like planting natural buffers such as eelgrass, which help absorb the shock of storm surges as oceans rise—a challenge that hard structures can't easily meet—while also luring water bugs, fish, birds, and shell reefs that support native oysters. 

Read more on Architectural Digest's site here


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10 teams selected to map Bay Area’s response to rising sea levels

By John King, September 10, 2017

With sea level rise expected to become a pressing threat here within decades, 10 design teams have been selected to map how the Bay Area can respond. Each team will receive up to $250,000 for its work, which begins this week and will conclude in May with adaptation strategies for 10 distinct locations along the edge of the bay. There’s no guarantee they will be built — but the high-visibility competition could make it easier to attract large-scale grants and funding.

The teams were announced Sunday at an event on the Richmond waterfront. They include representatives of nine countries, and were culled from 51 contenders. Several teams also include names that have star wattage, at least in the world of urban design.

Read more on The San Francisco Chronicle's site here or on SF Gate's site here


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MVRDV, Big, and James Corner Field Operations selected to future-proof Bay Area

By Antonio Pacheco, September 12, 2017

Resilient by Design | Bay Area has chosen 10 multi-disciplinary teams to partake in the next phase of a design challenge focused on future-proofing California’s San Francisco Bay Area against the destructive effects of climate change and sea level rise. 

The 10 teams will partner with community members and organizations over the next nine months to develop innovative approaches for the region. The teams include several notable architecture and landscape architecture firms, including BIG, MVRDV,  and James Corner Field Operations. Each of the selected teams contains at least one community member and several of the teams are entirely Bay Area–based.

Read more on The Architect's Newspaper's site here


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Star-studded design competition seeks to make Bay Area a model for Shoreline resiliency

By Mackenzie Goldberg, September 13, 2017

San Francisco is one of the many cities in the U.S. threatened by climate change. Scientific projections predict that sea level rise is likely to push tides upwards with accelerating force in the coming decades and a 2012 study estimated that the average high tide within San Francisco Bay could be 66 inches higher by 2100. 

Seeking to face the threat of rising sea levels head on, a group of community, industry and government leaders have launched a new competition in the Bay Area that seeks to restore shoreline resiliency, the phrase encompassing techniques that resist rising tides while at the same time providing ecological benefits. Think approaches like planting natural buffers such as eelgrass, which help absorb the shock of storm surges as oceans rise—a challenge that hard structures can't easily meet—while also luring water bugs, fish, birds, and shell reefs that support native oysters. 

Read more on Archinect's site here


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Inequality in the Bay Area Makes Preparing for Climate Change Impacts Harder

By Dave Nyczepir, September 18, 2017

Resilient by Design’s Bay Area Challenge chose 10 winning teams to each propose a project addressing resilience threats like sea level rise, severe storms, flooding or earthquakes in a critical region they identify.

Social inequalities and California’s affordable housing crisis compound resilience shocks in the Bay Area, making it harder for at-risk communities to rebound. Out of 51 submissions across 13 states and nine countries, challenge judges selected multidisciplinary teams consisting of architects, engineers, urban designers, ecologists, hydrologists and sustainability experts.

Read more on Route Fifty's site here


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BIG, MVRDV, James Corner and more to tackle Bay Area climate change

By Dan Howarth, September 19, 2017

Ten teams of architects and engineers have been chosen to design solutions that will help San Francisco and the surrounding region combat the effects of climate change. Resilient by Design's Bay Area Challenge asked entrants to come up with ideas to protect coastal areas from rising sea levels, flooding and earthquakes.

As the global climate warms and these kinds of events appear to be getting more frequent, the region doesn't want to take any chances.

Read more on Dezeen's site here.


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10 Design Teams Selected to Tackle Bay Area Sea Level Rise

 By Rachel Dovey, September 13, 2017

In January, the Rockefeller Foundation announced a design challenge to tackle sea-level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area modeled on a similar contest in New York. While the east coast challenge sought to address damage caused by Hurricane Sandy, its west coast cousin aims to proactively design regional climate mitigations before the waters rise. 

This week, 10 design teams have been chosen to participate from a pool of 51 submissions. Their members include urban planners, architects, engineers, ecologists and permaculture experts.

Read more on Next City's site here.